The UpStream

Zynga Buys OMGPOP for $200 Million

posted Saturday Mar 24, 2012 by Nicholas DiMeo

Zynga Buys OMGPOP for $200 Million

For a little over a year now, Zynga has been making a name for itself on its own. When investors started looking at the company as not just connected to Facebook and FarmVille, Zynga went and told the social media giant that they'd probably be better off as just friends, and decided to branch out and do something on its own. At the beginning of this year, we saw Zynga gain more investor popularity and the company has even started its own gaming platform, giving 240 million of its customers direct access to not only its own games, but games of partners it's been scooping up in the process.

This week, Zynga made another big purchase and bought the developer studio OMGPOP. Up until this point, the New York-based company was just another game studio that most people probably never heard of until the Draw Something craze hit shortly before Zynga picked them up to the tune of around $200 million.

Why the purchase and what happens now to your newest version of Pictionary? We discuss that more after the break.

Pirates Take to the Skies

posted Saturday Mar 24, 2012 by Scott Ertz

Pirates Take to the Skies

After a brief outage this week, The Pirate Bay, a popular torrent search site, confirmed that their outage was due to scheduled network maintenance and not some sort of government shut down. So, what kind of upgrades are they preparing for? Airships.

That's right - The Pirate Bay is working on developing servers that will float in the air. They will be powering their servers with Raspberry Pi machines - the $35 USB-powered computers. In a blog post, a TPB staff member said,

With the development of GPS controlled drones, far-reaching cheap radio equipment and tiny new computers like the Raspberry Pi, we're going to experiment with sending out some small drones that will float some kilometers up in the air. This way our machines will have to be shut down with aeroplanes in order to shut down the system. A real act of war.

I'm not sure it's so much an act of war as it is a defense mechanism to prevent what happened to Megaupload in January. The international copyright law is on their tail and they really have only 2 options - the air and the water, and it seems that the air is the easier and cheaper way to go.

It all makes you wonder, is there enough money in stealing other people's stuff to justify the expense of GPS-controlled aerial drone servers? Only time will tell.

Violent Videogames and the Law - Federal Edition

posted Saturday Mar 24, 2012 by Scott Ertz

Violent Videogames and the Law - Federal Edition

I predicted on F5 Live - Episode 245 that we had heard the last of violent videogame legislation for a while after the cost of the California loss. It turns out that I could not have been more wrong.

This week, two US Congressmen, Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA) and Representative Joe Baca (D-CA), have proposed a bill that would require all videogames not rated "EC", or Early Childhood, to carry a label warning,

WARNING: Exposure to violent video games has been linked to aggressive behavior.

There are a few things I feel I need to point out. First, Rep. Joe Baca is from California. I would have thought that their pitiful loss in the Supreme Court and the extreme cost to the already financially strapped state would have taught them a lesson; apparently not. Second, does his name not sound hilariously similar to Chewbacca? Lastly, and most importantly, Sesame Street: Once Upon A Monster is rated "E" for Everyone.

How do the Representatives justify the bill and what are its chances in Congress? Hit the break to find out.

Pakistan Backs Down on Internet Censorship

posted Saturday Mar 24, 2012 by Scott Ertz

Pakistan Backs Down on Internet Censorship

We reported last week about Pakistan's Request for Proposal (RFP) for an Internet filter for the country and McAfee's decision to not participate. Since McAfee wasn't the only company to have reservations about this idea and so far no company who is capable of accomplishing Pakistan's goal has had any interest in participating, Pakistan seems to have backed down.

Of course, we know that the Pakistani government isn't going to admin what they were doing was wrong and that they had made a mistake. Instead, they have spun the story and taken the coward's way out - blaming someone.

Who's going to take the fall for this one? Hit the break to find out.

Apple's New iPad Heats Up Conversation in More Than One Way

posted Thursday Mar 22, 2012 by Nicholas DiMeo

Apple's New iPad Heats Up Conversation in More Than One Way

Within the first three days of sales, Apple was able to break their own record with the new new iPad, selling 3 million of the devices. Analysts assumed Apple would only move approximately 500,000 to 1 million units and regardless of their mistake to make the new tablet easy to find on launch day in other retailers like Best Buy, they were still able to triple the projected number, which is an impressive feat in itself.

However (and there's always a however with an Apple report), I believe they have been a little too scared about Amazon's Kindle Fire and how well Amazon might actually do with their little tablet that could. Apple could be so scared, in fact, that they might even be taking a page out of the competitor's book as this week, we learned that this new version of the new iPad may be a little too hot to handle.

We have the burning scoop after the break.

Walmart Asks Customers to Bring in Their DVDs to Make Them Digital

posted Sunday Mar 18, 2012 by Nicholas DiMeo

Walmart Asks Customers to Bring in Their DVDs to Make Them Digital

We have another disc-to-digital story for you this week but I promise it's not like Sony selling CDs online, or the tried-but-failed Zediva or, our favorite new broadcast streaming service, Aereo.

This week, Walmart has announced that it believes DVDs are still relevant and that it will give customers a chance to further enhance their DVD viewing experience. How? For just $2, you can bring in your DVD to Walmart and you will get a copy on Walmart.com's cloud service, which is running on the UltraViolet software. That will get you the standard definition version but for high-def you will need to shell out $5.

For more on this project and why it's perfect for Walmart, click the break.

We're live now - Join us!
PLuGHiTZ Keyz

Email

Password

Forgot password? Recover here.
Not a member? Register now.
Blog Meets Brand Stats